Who We Are

  • Louise C. Ivers, MBBCh, BAO, MD, MPH, DTM&H
    Executive Director

    Dr. Louise Ivers is the Executive Director of the MGH Center for Global Health, an Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is a practicing infectious diseases physician at MGH, and works on the design, implementation, and evaluation of large-scale public health programs in resource-limited settings with the goal of achieving health equity.

    Dr. Louise Ivers is the Executive Director of the MGH Center for Global Health, an Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is a practicing infectious diseases physician at MGH, and works on the design, implementation, and evaluation of large-scale public health programs in resource-limited settings with the goal of achieving health equity.

    Dr. Ivers has spent her career providing care to the rural and urban poor, as well as engaged in patient-oriented investigation that offer solutions to barriers to healthcare. She has worked on healthcare delivery in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. She was based in Haiti and served as Clinical Director and then Chief of Mission for Partners In Health, Haiti from 2003 until 2012 while then a faculty member at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, designed and implemented HIV/TB programs, and led responses to the major earthquake in Haiti in 2010, and a subsequent cholera epidemic. From 2015-2017 she was a member of the executive leadership team at Partners In Health, responsible for global strategic implementation.

    In addition to expanding access to healthcare for the poor, Dr. Ivers has contributed to published research articles on HIV/AIDS, food insecurity, and cholera treatment and prevention. She is an independently-funded investigator focused on the barriers to the delivery of healthcare, the impact of food insecurity on public health, and comprehensive ways to eliminate cholera. Dr. Ivers is also involved in global policy and advocacy work to improve health equity. She has served as an Advisor to the WHO, and the Haitian Ministry of Health, and is a delegate to the Global Task Force for Cholera Control at WHO. She has collaborated with U.S. government, EU, multilateral, non-governmental organizations, and private industry partners. She mentors Haitian, American, and Irish physicians and students in global health implementation and research. She is the editor of a textbook on food insecurity and public health, and over 50 peer-reviewed published papers and chapters on global health issues.

    Dr. Ivers is a graduate of University College Dublin, Ireland where she received both her professional medical degrees, and a research doctorate in medicine. She completed residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the combined Harvard Infectious Diseases program. Dr. Ivers earned a diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Please see Dr. Ivers' Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.

  • Dr. Stephen Asiimwe
    Program Director, Global Health Collaborative, MUST-MGH, Uganda

    Stephen Asiimwe is the Program Director of the Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST)-Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Global Health Collaborative (GHC). He is a Physician Scientist with many years of collaborative clinical and population based research as well as program design and implementation in Uganda. Previously, he was the Executive Director of ICOBI, a national NGO with leading community interventions and research into HIV, TB and Malaria. He has a degree in Medicine & Surgery from Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda (1999) and a Masters Degree in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from Case Western Reserve University Ohio (2006) as well as a doctorate in public health Epidemiology and Health Policy at the University of Georgia, USA (2013).

    Stephen Asiimwe is the Program Director of the Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST)-Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Global Health Collaborative (GHC). He is a Physician Scientist with many years of collaborative clinical and population based research as well as program design and implementation in Uganda. Previously, he was the Executive Director of ICOBI, a national NGO with leading community interventions and research into HIV, TB and Malaria. He has a degree in Medicine & Surgery from Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda (1999) and a Masters Degree in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from Case Western Reserve University Ohio (2006) as well as a doctorate in public health Epidemiology and Health Policy at the University of Georgia, USA (2013).

    Before taking on the role of Program Director, he was involved in 8-10 years of active clinical practice (general medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology and surgery). His work seeing patients in the clinic with preventable illnesses led to his interest in population health, particularly in work related to HIV and STI prevention and management.  Stephen is now Principal and Co Principal Investigator at the Kabwohe Clinical Research Center (KCRC) and Integrated Community Based Initiatives (ICOBI) respectively in Uganda, both of which are centers of excellence in clinical and community-based medical research in Uganda that conduct, multi-center HIV prevention clinical/community trials among others. He is also an attending Clinician, and Co-Investigator, involved with teaching and collaborative research projects with colleagues at the University of Washington (Seattle), University of Georgia, Harvard Center for Global Health, Makerere University and Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in Uganda. Stephen is also an adjunct faculty and honorary lecturer of epidemiology and biostatistics at the MUST department of community health and assists train for the NIH supported MURTI program at MUST.

  • Hilarie Cranmer, MD, MPH
    Director of Global Disaster Response

    Dr. Cranmer is an emergency physician and educator working to advance practice standards for humanitarian responders. She has participated in the response to major humanitarian disasters, serving in the field during the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia, the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and the 2018 hurricane affected US and Caribbean. She served the Technical Advisor on Ebola for International Medical Corps during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and as Incident Commander for her teams deployed to the Philippines for Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, the Nepal Earthquake in 2015 and Hurricane Matthew- affected Haiti in 2016. 

    Dr. Cranmer is an emergency physician and educator working to advance practice standards for humanitarian responders. She has participated in the response to major humanitarian disasters, serving in the field during the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia, the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and the 2018 hurricane affected US and Caribbean. She served the Technical Advisor on Ebola for International Medical Corps during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and as Incident Commander for her teams deployed to the Philippines for Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, the Nepal Earthquake in 2015 and Hurricane Matthew- affected Haiti in 2016. 

    She is the first director of global disaster response at Massachusetts General Hospital’s (MGH) Center for Global Health, Cranmer is an Associate professor at the Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine and also at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in the Department of Global Health and Population. She continues to practice as clinical faculty in the Department of Emergency Medicine at MGH. She was awarded the 2015 Institute for International Medicines’ Humanitarian Crises Response Award and the 2015 Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit, its highest honor annually bestowed.

    Please see Dr. Cranmer's Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.

  • Pat Daoust, RN, MSN, FAAN
    Director, Global Nursing Program

    Pat Daoust, RN, MSN, FAAN, is the Director of the Global Nursing Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She sets the vision, operationalizes and provides leadership to all global nursing initiatives related to the organization’s mission. Pat serves on the Global Committee for the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care and the Advisory Committee for the Global Nursing Caucus.

    Pat Daoust, RN, MSN, FAAN, is the Director of the Global Nursing Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She sets the vision, operationalizes and provides leadership to all global nursing initiatives related to the organization’s mission. Pat serves on the Global Committee for the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care and the Advisory Committee for the Global Nursing Caucus.

    The reach and impact of her work spans three decades and two continents. As Director of Health Action AIDS for Physicians for Human Rights, she mobilized 10,000 health professionals to advocate for evidence-based policies related to the global AIDS epidemic, created the advocacy platform Health Rights=Healthy Women, developed innovative nursing programs that strengthen capacity to care for underserved populations  and testified at the US House of Representatives and Senate related to PEPFAR. She is unique in that she has disseminated her work in a variety of venues including presentations, book chapters, a documentary (highlighting the plight of grandmothers raising children of AIDS victims) and editorials published in the New York Times and Boston Globe. Her stature on the global stage is evidence by her invitation to be the first Chief Nursing Officer for the Global Health Service Program, a partnership between Peace Corps and Seed Global Health.

    Pat’s career trajectory is characterized by her enduring commitment to health as a human right and her dedication to the nursing profession. She has been the recipient of multiple awards including the Nursing Leadership Award by Sigma Theta Tau International, ANAC Public Service Award, AIDS Action Committee Heroes in Action Award, and the MGH Linda Kelly Visiting Scholar Recognition Award.

  • Matthew Gartland, MD
    Director, MGH Asylum Clinic at the Center for Global Health

    Matthew Gartland, MD, is the Director of the MGH Asylum Clinic at the MGH Center for Global Health and an Instructor at Harvard Medical School. The Asylum Clinic is comprised of more than 50 volunteer clinicians who perform forensic medical and psychological evaluations of survivors of persecution and torture seeking asylum in the United States. Dr. Gartland founded the clinic in 2017 and continues his leadership supervising evaluations, training clinicians, and disseminating research on best practices in the field of asylum medicine. 

    Matthew Gartland, MD, is the Director of the MGH Asylum Clinic at the MGH Center for Global Health and an Instructor at Harvard Medical School. The Asylum Clinic is comprised of more than 50 volunteer clinicians who perform forensic medical and psychological evaluations of survivors of persecution and torture seeking asylum in the United States. Dr. Gartland founded the clinic in 2017 and continues his leadership supervising evaluations, training clinicians, and disseminating research on best practices in the field of asylum medicine. 

    Dr. Gartland is also a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Immigrant Health Special Interest Group. He has worked extensively around the world on projects related to pediatric HIV and primary care in Mexico, Kenya, Zambia, and Liberia. Dr. Gartland earned his BA from Harvard College and his MD from Vanderbilt University. He completed residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is an Adult Hospitalist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a Pediatric Hospitalist at Newton-Wellesley Hospital. 

    Please see Dr. Gartland's Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.

  • Jessica Haberer, MD, MS
    Director of Global Health Research

    Jessica Haberer, MD, MS, is an internist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. She has been working in global health and studying adherence to antiretroviral medications for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection since the early 2000s. Her research focuses on real-time adherence monitoring and intervention. Current projects are based in Uganda, Kenya, and South Africa.

    Jessica Haberer, MD, MS, is an internist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. She has been working in global health and studying adherence to antiretroviral medications for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection since the early 2000s. Her research focuses on real-time adherence monitoring and intervention. Current projects are based in Uganda, Kenya, and South Africa.

    Please see Dr. Haberer's Harvard Catalyst profile for selected publications.

  • Vanessa Bradford Kerry, MD, MSc
    MGH Global Health Associate Director of Partnerships and Global Initiatives

    Dr. Kerry is the Associate Director of Partnerships and Global Initiatives at MGH Global Health. She helps to oversee clinical and education opportunities in global health and partnerships for MGH Global Health. She is also co-founder and the CEO of Seed Global Health. Having worked in resource‐limited settings for over a decade, Dr. Kerry has witnessed health inequities around many places in the world and how shortages of local health providers in their home countries contribute to those inequities. She believes that there should not - and need not - be two standards of care around the globe.  She envisions a solution where investing in health systems and health professional leadership can provide a sustainable, local solution to close disparities in care and health outcomes. Her work at Seed Global Health and in partnership with MGH is helping to close training and care gaps in sub-Saharan Africa through education. The Seed program sends American health professionals to help train the next generation of doctors, nurses and midwives in countries with critical health needs. These health professionals then teach others, creating a pipeline of needed, skilled providers and educators. Seed has helped train over 14,000 health professionals since its inception in 2012. Dr. Kerry also runs the Discovery Health MGH Fellowship which hosts South African academic clinician leaders to train at MGH for one year.

    Please see Dr. Kerry's Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.

  • Kristian Olson, MD, MPH, DTM&H
    Director, Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech)

    Kristian Olson is the Director of the Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech). CAMTech is an open innovation platform that facilitates Patient Driven Innovations from ideation to impact. Kris is a Pediatrician and Internist and serves as a member of the Core Educator Faculty at the Massachusetts General Hospital where he is also Chief Innovation Officer for the Department of Medicine’s Residency Program and an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. He has worked in Thailand, Darfur, Indonesia, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Uganda, India, and the United States, is a serial innovator, and an architect of the CAMTech Innovation platform.

    Kristian Olson is the Director of the Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech). CAMTech is an open innovation platform that facilitates Patient Driven Innovations from ideation to impact. Kris is a Pediatrician and Internist and serves as a member of the Core Educator Faculty at the Massachusetts General Hospital where he is also Chief Innovation Officer for the Department of Medicine’s Residency Program and an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. He has worked in Thailand, Darfur, Indonesia, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Uganda, India, and the United States, is a serial innovator, and an architect of the CAMTech Innovation platform.

    He completed an undergraduate degree in biology at the University of British Columbia, medical school at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and his residency training in the Harvard Combined Medicine and Pediatrics Program. He trained in the Masters of Public Health program at the University of Sydney as a US Fulbright Scholar and completed a Diploma in Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

    In 2009, he was named to the Scientific American Top 10 Honor Roll as an individual who has demonstrated leadership in applying new technologies and biomedical discoveries for the benefit of humanity.

    Please see Dr. Olson's Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.

  • Geren Stone, MD, DTM&H
    Director, Global Medicine Program

    Dr. Geren Stone completed his Internal Medicine/Primary Care residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Following residency, Dr. Stone received a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.  Dr. Stone then worked with Indiana University as the Medicine Team Liaison for the AMPATH program (Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare) in Eldoret, Kenya.  In that role, he coordinated the experiences of visiting medical students and residents while also holding teaching and clinical responsibilities as a Visiting Lecturer for Moi University. He worked closely with the leadership of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital to examine the quality of care on the medical wards and to create systems for continual improvement.

    Dr. Geren Stone completed his Internal Medicine/Primary Care residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Following residency, Dr. Stone received a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.  Dr. Stone then worked with Indiana University as the Medicine Team Liaison for the AMPATH program (Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare) in Eldoret, Kenya.  In that role, he coordinated the experiences of visiting medical students and residents while also holding teaching and clinical responsibilities as a Visiting Lecturer for Moi University. He worked closely with the leadership of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital to examine the quality of care on the medical wards and to create systems for continual improvement.

    Originally from Atlanta, Dr. Stone received a Bachelor degree in Sociology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He then worked in Tajikistan with physicians providing medical training in family medicine and caring for TB patients in the prison system.  After that experience, he returned to earn his Medical Degree from University of Virginia School of Medicine.

    Ultimately, his interest is engaging disparities and the systems that generate them.  He returned to MGH as the Global Medicine program director with a desire to work and think creatively in building mutually beneficial partnerships locally and globally that train leaders, allow for cutting edge innovation and research, and impact the health of communities.  Working as a primary care provider for Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, he hopes to model a career engaging vulnerable populations locally and globally.

    Please see Dr. Stone's Harvard Catalyst Profile for selected publications.