Gun Violence Prevention Challenge Summit & Hack-a-thon

April 13 – 15, 2018 | Boston, Massachusetts | #GunViolenceHack

During the Gun Violence Prevention Challenge Summit & Hack-a-thon, the Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech) employed a public health approach to gun violence prevention by generating innovations that can address gun safety, mental health, community resilience, and policy.

Congratulations to the Gun Violence Prevention Hack-a-thon Award Winners!

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Tech Innovation Award ($1,000): Team Sobriety Control Gun (SCG) – an alcohol sensing firearm locking device that uses a breathalyzer and combination lock to replace the existing cable lock

Communications Strategy Award ($1,000): Team Good Guys with a Gun – an app-based educational tool that trains gun owners about safe firearm storage

Community Resilience Award ($1,000): Team Dream Alive – an online platform that links families and individuals affected by gun violence to mentors and social services

Competing for a $10K Post-Hack-a-thon Award

Gun Violence Prevention Demo Day

Friday, June 15, 2018

2:00 PM – 4:30 PM

MGH Simches Research Center

185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA

carbine trigger and safety

The Challenge Summit convened clinicians, government representatives, public health experts and affected community members to facilitate a discussion of challenges and provide critical insight into gun violence prevention. The Hack-a-thon served as an open-innovation platform for a diverse community to co-create innovations over a 48-hour period. Through cross-disciplinary collaboration, mentorship and award incentives, teams can accelerate ideas into breakthrough innovations with

the potential to curb the epidemic of gun violence and improve the lives of survivors. Through its “co-creation” model, CAMTech convened experts in health, engineering and business to increase awareness and generate solutions to improve gun violence prevention. Innovators developed technologies that are not only user-centric, technologically-disruptive and socially-impactful, but also commercially-viable. Working together, there is the power to effect real change and save lives.

WE
MW
TimeDescription
7:45 AM - 9:00 AMRegistration and Breakfast
9:05 AM - 9:20 AMWelcoming Remarks
Dr. Kristian Olson, CAMTech Director
9:20 AM - 9:35 AMOpening Remarks
Dr. Tim Ferris, Massachusetts General Physicians Organization
9:40 AM - 10:00 AMMorning Keynote
Commissioner William B. Evans, Boston Police Department
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMFireside Chat
Commissioner William B. Evans, Boston Police Department
Dr. Peter Masiakos, Massachusetts General Hospital
10:30 AM - 10:45 AMBreak
10:50 AM - 11:35 AMPanel 1:
Self-Inflicted Gun Violence

Dr. Sandro Galea, Boston University School of Public Health
Monica Valdes Lupi, Boston Public Health Commission
Mary Vriniotis, Harvard Injury Control Research Center
Angus McQuilken, Massachusetts Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence
11:35 AM - 11:50 AMPersonal Story
Dr. Joseph Sakran, Johns Hopkins University
11:50 AM - 12:35 PMPanel 2:
Unintentional Shootings

Dr. Joseph Sakran, Johns Hopkins University
Sheriff Peter Koutoujian, Middlesex County Sheriff's Office
Dr. David Hemenway, Harvard School of Public Health
John Rosenthal, Stop Handgun Violence
Dr. Judith Palfrey, Boston Children's Hospital
12:35 PM - 12:50 PMPersonal Story
Martin Henson, Black Lives Matter - Boston
12:50 PM - 1:30 PMLunch
1:35 PM - 2:20 PMPanel 3:
Gun Assaults

Dr. Michael Siegel, Boston University School of Public Health
Mike Weisser, Huffington Post columnist on gun violence and gun business owner
Rachel Rodrigues, Louis D. Brown Peace Institute
Kevin Lynch, The Resolve to Stop the Violence Project
2:20 PM - 2:35 PMPersonal Story
Joshua McGill, Orlando Pulse Nightclub
2:35 PM - 2:55 PMAfternoon Keynote
Mayor Martin J. Walsh, City of Boston
2:55 PM - 3:35 PMInteractive Coffee Session: Challenge Identification
3:40 PM - 4:25 PMPanel 4:
Mass Shootings

Dr. Douglas Wiebe, University of Pennsylvania
Ruhi Bengali, Everytown for Gun Safety
Kristen Bauer, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America
4:25 PM - 4:40 PMPersonal Story
Jody Marchand, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America
4:40 PM - 5:00 PMClosing Remarks
Dr. Kristian Olson, CAMTech Director

Saturday, April 14, 2018

TimeDescription
8:00 AM - 9:00 AMRegistration and Breakfast
9:05 AM - 9:15 AMWelcoming Remarks (Dr. Kristian Olson, CAMTech)
9:15 AM - 9:30 AMMorning Keynote (Kai Kloepfer, Biofire Technologies)
9:30 AM - 9:45 AMGuns 101: An introduction to bullets and shells, speeds and energy, and wound patterns (Dr. Ryan Carroll, Massachusetts General Hospital)
9:45 AM - 10:45 AMHacking 101: An introduction to the hack-a-thon model, overview of the schedule, expectations for the weekend, rules, format, and judges (Sahil Mehta, Lattice Innovations)
10:45 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 1:00 PMPitching: All participants, mentors and speakers have an opportunity to present a challenge related to gun safety in 60 seconds or less
1:00 PM - 1:30 PMLunch and Networking: Innovators self-assemble into cross-disciplinary teams
1:30 PM - 2:00 PMMentor Debrief: An overview of the mentoring process and expectations (mentors only)
1:30 PM - 6:00 PMHacking Commences: Participants finalize their teams and begin to develop their ideas, innovations and prototypes with mentor support. Hack Shop opens. Team registration link opens.
6:00 PM - 6:30 PMDinner
6:30 PM - 2:00 AMHacking Continues: Teams continue working and iterating through the evening (all participants must leave the MGH Simches Research Center by 2:00 AM)
11:59 PMDeadline for Team Registration and Practice Pitch Sign-Ups: Teams must register their concepts online to be eligible to present on Sunday
2:00 AMAll participants must leave the MGH Simches Research Center

Sunday, April 15, 2018

TimeDescription
7:00 AM - 2:00 PMDoors Open and Hacking Continues: Teams work with mentors to refine their ideas, develop prototypes and think through implementation models (optional start time for participants)
9:00 AM Breakfast
9:00 AM - 12:00 PMPractice Pitch Sessions: Teams prepare their final presentations
12:00 PMLunch
12:30 PMJudges Debrief: Judges convene to discuss evaluation process (judges only)
2:00 PM - 4:30 PMFinal Presentations: Teams deliver 3-minute final presentations and 2-minute Q&A with judging panel
4:30 PM - 5:00 PMJudge Deliberation, Feedback Session, and Next Steps: Participants and mentors share feedback with event organizers and learn about post hack-a-thon opportunities
5:00 - 5:30 PMPrizes and Closing Remarks

Speakers

Dr. Kristian Olson, CAMTech

Dr. Tim Ferris, Massachusetts General Hospital Physicians Organization

Dr. Peter Masiakos, Massachusetts General Hospital

Commissioner William B. Evans, Boston Police Department

Dr. Sandro Galea, Boston University School of Public Health

Monica Valdes Lupi, Boston Public Health Commission

Mary Vriniotis, Harvard Injury Control Research Center

Angus McQuilken, Massachusetts Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence

Dr. Joseph Sakran, Johns Hopkins University

Dr. David Hemenway, Harvard School of Public Health

Sheriff Peter Koutoujian, Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office

John Rosenthal, Stop Handgun Violence

Dr. Judith Palfrey, Boston Children’s Hospital

Martin Henson, Black Lives Matter – Boston

Dr. Michael Siegel, Boston University School of Public Health

Mike Weisser, Huffington Post Columnist and Gun Business Owner

Rachel Rodrigues, Louis D. Brown Peace Institute

Kevin Lynch, The Resolve to Stop the Violence Project

Joshua McGill, Orlando Pulse Nightclub Survivor

Mayor Martin J. Walsh, City of Boston

Dr. Douglas Wiebe, University of Pennsylvania

Ruhi Bengali, Everytown for Gun Safety

Kristen Bauer, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America

Jody Marchand, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America

Mentors

Claire Boine, Boston University School of Public Health

Molly Pahn, Boston University School of Public Health

Anita Knopov, Boston University School of Public Health

Dr. Douglas Wiebe, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. David Hemenway, Harvard School of Public Health

Morgan Matthews, N Square Collaborative

Tom Weis, Rhode Island School of Design

Mike Weisser

Joshua McGill

Dr. Louis Klarevas, University of Massachusetts – Boston

Liz Vyas, Biogen

Sarah Konstantino, Optum

Mary Sebert, Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Margaret Seater, Massachusetts General Hospital

Julia Cartwright, New York University

Kai Kloepfer, Biofire Technologies 

Sarah Fitzgerald, Liberty Mutual

Dr. James Rifino, Wachusett Emergency Physicians

Kaleigh Killoran, Harvard Business School

Eliza Coan, Liberty Mutual

Dr. Shiva Sinha, Medtronic

Jonathan Miller, Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office

Tim Maly, Rhode Island School of Design

Larissa Purnell, Optum

Harold Roy, Massachusetts General Hospital

Prizes

Post-Hack-a-thon Award: $10,000

Tech Innovation Award: $1,000

Community Resilience Award: $1,000

Communications Strategy Award: $1,000

Gun Violence Prevention Challenges

CategoryExamples of Gun Violence Prevention Challenges Pitched
Communications StrategiesIn the US, adamant mindsets that don't allow for creative discussion around possibilities for gun violence prevention. Difficulty in talking about firearm safety as a public health and injury prevention topic because of the overlap with politics and constitutional rights. Media exposure to children. Is there a way to unify the various gun control advocacy groups under a single platform that is able to adequately challenge the strength of the NRA? How does the City’s government, nongovernmental organizations and civil society communicate over the next 36 months with young men and women (ages 13 - 33) who are buying, circulating, carrying, using and being victimized by guns in a manner that results in fewer guns in Boston and fewer non-fatal and fatal shootings?
Policy ImplementationSecondary (black) market is unregulated. Protection order policies.
Storage and Access to FirearmsUnsafe firearm storage practices by parents place children at risk for unintentional and self-inflicted firearm injury and mortality. Currently, parents either are not aware of safe storage practices, or do not deem such practices necessary to keep their children safe. A focus on how guns are sold and the process to get your hands on one. Gun storage technology and stronger gun storage requirements. Guns falling into the hands of people who intend to use them to commit crimes.
EducationLack of knowledge about gun industry by public health specialists and gun violence prevention advocates. Educate practitioners on how they can feel comfortable and empowered to have the difficult conversation with patients about the dangers of firearms.
Mental HealthThe complexity in layering the historical, political, religious, social, and commercial implications that impact how gun ownership is perceived and the psycho-social elements/scenarios that influence people to resort to gun violence. Behavioral health impact on both the gun owner as well as those who feel at risk of gun violence. Solutions have done very little to alter the amount of suicides and attempts by gun violence. While more research is needed, innovative trials of interventions might just be what is necessary to slow the rates of guns used in this manner. Reaching at-risk individuals with information about reducing access to lethal means. Critical to develop a strategy that links individuals (often youth) to appropriate care within their communities, whether it be at school or elsewhere.
School ShootingsEarly detection of gun violence in the schools.
Clinical RecommendationsLimited evidence-based clinical recommendations for physicians to follow when either screening for firearm safety or taking care of someone with exposure to firearms or already injured from firearms. Developing tools that will enhance the comfort level of nurses when discussing gun safety storage with patients and the general public. Harm reduction strategies.
Fundraising StrategiesATF woefully underfunded to audit gun retailers. Develop a fundraising strategy to raise adequate funds among private sector financial resources for firearm injury prevention research.
Research and Data CollectionTiahrt amendment limits data access, and 8 states lack funding to contribute data to NVDRS. Insufficient data due to optional rather than mandatory reporting of crime data by law enforcement to FBI. Inadequate surveying measures and proper metrics for safety. Capturing gun manufacture data from gun violence reports/gun confiscation reports, public and police data.
Community ResilienceRacial disparities. Not enough focus and investment in solutions driven by those most impacted. Fear in reporting gun violence, especially when executed by gang members. Intersection of domestic violence and guns, an issue disproportionately affecting women and children.

Judges

Ladi Olaoye, National Society of Black Engineers

Ben Beck, ELEVEN

Anne Donohue, Boston University College of Communications

Dr. Peter Masiakos, Massachusetts General Hospital

Judging Criteria

CategoryDescription of Category
Public Health, Clinical, or Social Impact NeedFocuses on a significant unaddressed public health, clinical need, and or social impact. This innovation demonstrates potential for addressing a significant component of the identified need.
Clear Problem StatementClear understanding of the problem statement; well-dissected problem statement.
Technology, Communication Strategy, and/or Community Resilience InnovationOffers new and creative process, communication strategy, or technology solution (‘better/faster/cheaper’). Provides convincing rationale for why this unique approach has the potential to work (if not already developed). Addresses significant process or technical issues relevant for the users and implementation setting.
Sustainable Business Model & Plan Moving ForwardIdentifies clear model to build and sustain business strategy. Feasible to partner with organizations to disseminate technology/process. Clear plan for the next 60 days - what does the team intend to do?
TeamBrings cross-disciplinary expertise in technology development, clinical medicine, social sciences, business/implementation, and/or other relevant skill sets. Incorporates end-user input/feedback.
PitchDemonstrates the prototype or solution effectively. Clearly articulates the problem the process, communication strategy, or technology proposes to address.